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Magento 2 is coming. No, really, it is…

February 2, 2015
Magento ended 2014 by providing a huge boost for storeowners and developers alike, with the delivery of a developer beta vers...

Magento ended 2014 by providing a huge boost for storeowners and developers alike, with the delivery of a developer beta version of Magento 2.

Even better, Magento went public with commitments that they plan to make Magento 2 available on general release to merchants before the end of 2015. Given that Magento 2 has a history dating back to 2010, one could be forgiven for taking that timeline with a pinch of salt. However, from all that we’ve seen and heard, we are starting to take them quite seriously this time!

So, is it time for merchants to start planning an implementation of Magento 2? With the promise of faster deployment, better scalability, easier customisation and more flexible integration of extensions, there will be many competitive advantages for merchants ready to upgrade to Magento 2 as soon as it is available.

Here are 8 business questions you should be asking yourselves about Magento 2 right now:

What’s the roadmap for the Magento 2 release?
Magento 2 is scheduled to be on general availability to merchants by the end of 2015, preceded by a beta version for merchants in Q3. Already, Magento is looking for feedback from developers on the beta version released in December 2014, before a final developer release at the end of Q1 2015.

How will we benefit from Magento 2’s technology changes?
Magento 2’s core technology is a big leap forward from the code used to build Magento 1. That’s because it is built using the latest technology standards and modern technologies, such as jQuery, HTML5, CSS3, with support for PHP 5.5 and MySQL 5.6.

HTML5 means that Magento websites will be responsive right out of the box, making the mobile shopping experience much more intuitive on any device. CSS3 will make for faster loading webpages (Google will reward you in the SERPs for this) and the potential for better visual effects. The PHP and MySQL changes will make for faster performance, better search and importantly, more database scalability.

Overall, developers will be using code they already know, that is based on common standards and that is less time-consuming to learn. This will make it faster for storeowners to make changes and upgrade rapidly, at lower development and long-term maintenance costs. With a less steep learning curve, new merchants will be able to get to market more quickly.

We love Magento 1 but will Magento 2 be easier to customise?
One of Magento’s strengths has been its ability to customise specific features to create unique user experiences. But customisation has not always been as straightforward with Magento as it could have been.

With Magento 2, the customisation process has been streamlined. The code has been made much more modular; developers will now be able to make changes which don’t impact as much on other areas of the code. This means that less things can go wrong when customisations are made; faster integration will be possible with external systems due to simplicity; and more predictable outcomes to changes can be made.

Will Magento 2 be more flexible to changing customer needs?
Changes to the way that the site’s front end is developed means that it’s going to be much easier to customise the look and feel of a site without changing site functionality. Magento designers are going to be able to work more autonomously with the front-end, without having to rely on heavy-lifting coders every time, allowing quicker improvements to the user experience and user interface.

For new projects, a key change is that Magento 2 will include a blank theme straight out of the box. This could speed up time to market, as the theme is a great starting point for Magento developers, with useful examples and no specific customisations.

We’re growing rapidly: how will Magento 2 help us scale?
As online buying booms, scalability is hugely important for growing merchants. Magento 2 will introduce new features to improve scalability by reducing server load, such as caching of content pages and common server requests. Performance will be improved by more efficient updates and faster queries, and also by test scripts, which will optimise performance speeds before going live.

Will we suffer any downtime caused by lengthy upgrades?
Magento 2 makes it easier to upgrade the core Magento software – and to install and upgrade extensions. Information on versioning policies and compatibility of upgrades will allow developers to anticipate probable upgrade scenarios, and to prepare for them. A new standalone installer will make for initial speedier installations. A further module will provide detailed version compatibility information for extensions, contributing to cleaner, faster installation and upgrades.

OK, this all sounds great – but where’s the downside?
You can’t make an omelette without breaking a few eggs. When upgrading to Magento 2, merchants will have to recreate any theme customisations that were made in the current platform, as the theme structure in Magento 2 is different. Likewise, with extensions that are built on the current platform.

I’m not convinced. How long will I have before support for Magento 1 ends?
It looks like the Magento team is planning to support Magento 1 for a full three years from the time that Magento 2 is released.

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to blog more specifically about preparations you can start to make now.

For example, you might do a code audit, to determine what functionality will work – and won’t work – when you migrate to Magento 2. We’ll look also at what to do about extensions you are using; will these be upgraded in time for the Magento 2 general release? Or, if you’re planning a new site, how might you go ahead with Magento 1 while keeping things compatible with Magento 2?

Watch out for upcoming blog posts to ensure you’re ahead of the game!

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Da jedoch überall nur Menschen am Werk sind, können Fehler nicht zu 100 % ausgeschlossen werden. Um dennoch ein höchstmögliches Mass an Sicherheit bieten zu können, sind unsere Berater/innen verpflichtet, für jeden getätigten Abschluss direkt im Anschluss an die Beratung gemeinsam mit dem Kunden ein Beratungsprotokoll zu erstellen. Dieses wird dann sowohl vom Kunden, als auch vom Berater unterzeichnet.

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium.

Da jedoch überall nur Menschen am Werk sind, können Fehler nicht zu 100 % ausgeschlossen werden. Um dennoch ein höchstmögliches Mass an Sicherheit bieten zu können, sind unsere Berater/innen verpflichtet, für jeden getätigten Abschluss direkt im Anschluss an die Beratung gemeinsam mit dem Kunden ein Beratungsprotokoll zu erstellen. Dieses wird dann sowohl vom Kunden, als auch vom Berater unterzeichnet.

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium.

Da jedoch überall nur Menschen am Werk sind, können Fehler nicht zu 100 % ausgeschlossen werden. Um dennoch ein höchstmögliches Mass an Sicherheit bieten zu können, sind unsere Berater/innen verpflichtet, für jeden getätigten Abschluss direkt im Anschluss an die Beratung gemeinsam mit dem Kunden ein Beratungsprotokoll zu erstellen. Dieses wird dann sowohl vom Kunden, als auch vom Berater unterzeichnet.

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium.

Da jedoch überall nur Menschen am Werk sind, können Fehler nicht zu 100 % ausgeschlossen werden. Um dennoch ein höchstmögliches Mass an Sicherheit bieten zu können, sind unsere Berater/innen verpflichtet, für jeden getätigten Abschluss direkt im Anschluss an die Beratung gemeinsam mit dem Kunden ein Beratungsprotokoll zu erstellen. Dieses wird dann sowohl vom Kunden, als auch vom Berater unterzeichnet.

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